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English Fact Sheets & Info Booklets

The ASRM Patient Fact Sheet  is a series produced under the direction of the ASRM Patient Education Committee and the Publications Committee.

These fact sheets may be printed and distributed to patients to enhance patient education as long as the text is not altered and proper credit must be attributed to ASRM.  Additional copies of booklets can be purchased in the ASRM Store

Some Patient Education Fact Sheets are available en Español and 中文版本. 

  

Age and Fertility (booklet)

Generally, reproductive potential decreases as women get older, and fertility can be expected to end 5 to 10 years before menopause.

Defining Infertility

Infertility is “the inability to conceive after 12 months of unprotected intercourse.”

Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

An evaluation of a woman for infertility is appropriate for women who have not become pregnant after having 12 months of regular, unprotected intercourse.

Does My Age Affect My Fertility?

A woman’s age is one of the most important factors affecting whether she is able to conceive and give birth to a healthy child. This is due to several changes that are a natural part of aging.

Fertility Options After Vasectomy

Vasectomy is currently one of the most common methods of sterilization in the United States. After your vasectomy, if you change your mind about having children, there are two procedures that can help you have a child with your partner.

Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where To Find It

Infertility is a medical condition that touches all aspects of your life. It may affect your relationships with others, your perspective on life, and how you feel about yourself. How you deal with these feelings will depend on your personality and life experiences.

In Vitro Fertilization (IVF): What Are the Risks?

IVF is a method of assisted reproduction in which a man’s sperm and a woman’s eggs are combined outside of the body in a laboratory dish. One or more fertilized eggs (embryos) may be transferred into the woman’s uterus, where they may implant in the uterine lining and develop.

Male Infertility Evaluation: What Do I Need To Know?

Male factors alone are the cause of infertility in 20%–30% of couples and contribute to infertility in another 20%–30% of couples. Overall, about one half of infertile couples have male factor causes.

Optimizing Male Fertility

The chance of a normal couple conceiving is 20% to 37% by three months, 75% by six months, and 90% at one year. Of those couples that do not conceive in the first year, as many as 50% will conceive in the next year.

Sperm Morphology (Shape): Does It Affect Fertility?

The most common test of a man’s fertility is a semen analysis. This measures many features of the sperm and semen (the fluid in which the sperm are contained). The most important of these are the number of sperm (sperm count), motility of the sperm (percentage of moving sperm), morphology of the sperm (percentage of normally shaped sperm), and the volume of fluid.

Testosterone Use And Male Infertility

Testosterone (also referred to as “T”) is a hormone
produced in men by the testes (testicles). It is involved
in muscle and bone development, hair growth, and
development of sex organs such as the penis and
prostate.

Varicocele

A varicocele is a variation of normal anatomy in which veins in the scrotum (the sac that holds the testicles) become enlarged and sometimes even visible. Varicocele usually is first found at puberty and is much more common on the left side than on the right side. Sometimes it occurs on both sides.

Weight and Fertility

One of the easiest ways to determine if you are underweight or overweight is to calculate your body mass index (BMI). There are many tables available online (search term: BMI table). Enter your height and weight into the tool to see your BMI.

ReproductiveFacts.org
is a patient education website of ASRM.
 

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