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Men Diagnosed with Azoospermia Are at Increased Risk of Death

Note: All information is embargoed until the time of presentation at the Scientific Congress, unless otherwise indicated.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE’S 2018 SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS & EXPO

Embargoed for Release: 12:01 am CDT Tuesday, October 9, 2018 

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Eleanor Nicoll - enicoll@asrm.org - 202-863-2439  (thru Oct 5) - 240-274-2209 mobile                    
Sean Tipton - stipton@asrm.org - 202-863-2494 (thru Oct 3)

Note: Press room open Sun. October 7, 2pm-5pm CDT; Mon. October 8-Wed. October 10 8:00am-5:30pm CDT.

Men Diagnosed with Azoospermia Are at Increased Risk of Death

Denver, CO-  Today, Scandinavian and American researchers presented the outcomes of a large prospective cohort study, looking at the connection between mortality risk and a diagnosis of male factor infertility.  Men diagnosed with azoospermia- no sperm observed in the ejaculate- were found to be at increased risk of dying during the years following assisted reproduction treatment compared to men with no male factor diagnosis. This risk was not seen for men with low sperm counts.

Data from 51,289 men the Danish National IVF register, entered between 1994 and 2015, were analyzed.  From 1994 through 2005, a diagnosis of male factor infertility was recorded as “yes” or “no.”  From 2006 through 2015 a specific diagnosis was given. Men with pre-2006 male factor=no diagnoses, a diagnosis of normal semen analysis, and vasectomized men were included in the reference group. Data from 2006 onward were analyzed separately to investigate whether the infertility diagnosis had an impact on mortality rates.  All men were followed until the end of the study period, or death, or emigration from Denmark.

The average follow-up time was 7.8 years and the most prevalent causes of death were cardiovascular disease (108 men) and cancer (180 men) with an average age of death of 48.8. 

When data from the entire period were analyzed, there was no difference in risk of death between men with male factor infertility versus men with no male factor infertility who had undergone assisted reproduction. However, when different diagnoses of male infertility were broken out for the years 2006 through 2015, men with azoospermia had a two times greater chance of dying, while men with low sperm counts or other diagnoses of male infertility had the same risk of dying as men with no infertility diagnosis or vasectomized men.

Peter Schlegel, MD, ASRM President-Elect, noted, “A man’s infertility status is a component of his whole health status. Semen analysis results exist on a continuum, but a diagnosis of azoospermia may be a call to take a closer look at a man’s over-all health in addition to his reproductive function.”

O-91 Glazer et al, MALE FACTOR INFERTILITY AND RISK OF MORTALITY: A REGISTER BASED COHORT STUDY.

 

ASRM is a multidisciplinary organization dedicated to the advancement of the science and practice of reproductive medicine. The Society accomplishes its mission through the pursuit of excellence in education and research and through advocacy on behalf of patients, physicians, and affiliated health care providers. The Society is committed to facilitating and sponsoring educational activities for the lay public and continuing medical education activities for professionals who are engaged in the practice of and research in reproductive medicine. www.asrm.org


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Contact:

Sean Tipton
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Email: stipton@asrm.org

Eleanor Nicoll
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Email: enicoll@asrm.org

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Zika